Tag Archives: tap project

Sarah Kauss on the Water Crisis

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By Sarah Kauss, Founder & CEO of S’wellblog_unicef_content

Clean water. Without a second thought, we simply turn the knob and it comes flowing out of the faucet. But the accessibility to clean water that is so customary to us is a luxury that people around the world do not have.

I have always been very passionate about the environment and educating people to use less plastic. It is part of what fueled my desire to create a reusable water bottle, which later turned into S’well. But when I attended my 5-year MBA reunion at Harvard and attended a presentation about the water crisis, I learned how many people in the world do not have access to clean drinking water. I immediately knew that the water crisis was something that could be somehow addressed by my idea to create a better water bottle.

In came the U.S. Fund for UNICEF. The organization supports UNICEF‘s work, and other efforts in support of the world’s children, through fundraising, advocacy and education in the United States. For the second year in a row, S’well is so proud to be part of their work by donating $100,000 to help provide clean water to the world’s most vulnerable children.

Did you know that with just $1, UNICEF can provide one child safe drinking water for a month? This World Water Day, S’well is proud to once again support the UNICEF Tap Project. The Project is a nationwide campaign that provides clean water and adequate sanitation to children around the world. UNICEF works in more than 100 countries around the world to improve access to safe water and sanitation facilities in schools and communities and to promote safe hygiene practices.

Simply open uniceftapproject.org on your phone. For every five minutes you go without touching your phone (that’s right, no texting, calling, emailing, tweeting, instagramming, posting, etc) sponsors and donors will fund one day of clean water for a child in need. It’s that easy. So challenge yourself, your family, your friends, your coworkers to disconnect and make a difference.

World Water Day is on Tuesday, March 22. On that day, when you shop on swellbottle.com, S’well will donate 20% of your purchase to the U.S. fund for UNICEF in support of the UNICEF Tap Project. To find out more visit www.uniceftapproject.org.

*UNICEF does not endorse any brand or product. None of the purchase price is tax deductible

S’well x Water

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It’s summertime and we’re all surrounded by water frequently, whether it be a weekend at the beach, spending time at the neighborhood pool or keeping a S’well bottle full of cold water throughout the day. While we’re all enjoying the wonders of water, it’s important to take a minute to acknowledge that there are still nearly 748 million people in the world that do not have the access to clean water.

S’well knows the importance of water and how it impacts not only our bodies but also communities. That’s why this year S’well supported the U.S Fund for UNICEF Tap Project with a $100,000 donation. UNICEF works in more than 100 countries to improve access to safe water and sanitation facilities. Whether by restoring access to clean water after a disaster or promoting safe hygiene practices in schools and communities, UNICEF is on the ground helping children in need.

Since 1990, UNICEF and its partners have helped more than two billion people gain access to safe drinking water. We still have a way to go but S’well is helping make progress possible. To find out more about how you can get involved visit www.unicefusa.org.

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WWD: Unicef Tap Project

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S’well is proud to support the UNICEF Tap Project for the first time in 2015. With a $100,000 donation, S’well is supporting UNICEF’s efforts to provide safe, clean water to the world’s most vulnerable children.

The UNICEF Tap Project is back! This year’s initiative asks Americans to unlock 14 million days of clean water for children around the world by encouraging you to stop texting, calling, emailing, tweeting and posting — and challenge your friends to do the same. Millions of children around the globe do not have safe water to drink, and the lack of this basic necessity isn’t just inconvenient — it’s lethal. Take the challenge on your cell phone at www.uniceftapproject.org  throughout the month of March. The longer you go without touching your smartphone, the more clean water will be unlocked for children in need.

The UNICEF Tap Project is a nationwide campaign that provides clean water and adequate sanitation to children around the world. UNICEF works in more than 100 countries around the world to improve access to safe water and sanitation facilities in schools and communities and to promote safe hygiene practices.

For instance, a week after the Category 5 Tropical Cyclone Pam hit the Pacific Islands, UNICEF and partners are rushing water containers, purification tablets and soap to help address the immediate needs of the estimated 60,000 children affected. Initial reports indicate that in two of the six most affected provinces in Vanuatu, Shefa and Tafea, around 60% of the population have no access to safe drinking water, a lifeline for children and families at this critical time.

Additionally, following  the devastating Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines in 2013, UNICEF delivered water kits, water treatment products, portable toilets, and hygiene kits to hundreds of thousands of people in need in order to help prevent the spread of disease.

Unite to fight the world water crisis: For every 15 minutes you don’t touch your phone within the UNICEF Tap Project experience, sponsors and donors can fund one day of clean water for a child in need.

Take the challenge on your cell phone at: www.uniceftapproject.org

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Do you freak out when a jumble of words and numbers are thrown at you? We know there are lots of numbers and facts involved in these statistics, and sometimes they can be overwhelming to swallow. We feel you. But it’s important to understand what’s happening outside our little bubbles. So we created this infographic so that it’s easier to visualize the reality of the lack of safe water & sanitation, and to show what you can do to change that.